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  1. #11
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    History
    MONARO – A PSYCHEDELIC SIXTIES ICON
    • Original Holden Monaro debuted in 1968
    • The first all-Australian sports car
    • A benchmark design
    Set against a backdrop of 2001: A Space Odyssey and to a soundtrack of Voodoo Child by Jimi Hendrix, the original Holden Monaro roared on to the scene in 1968. Achingly cool, Monaro was the first ever sports car to be built entirely in Australia for the Australian market.
    The product of a nascent Holden design studio, Monaro was influenced directly by the trends of America. Not surprisingly it was semi-modelled on an American design, the Oldsmobile Toronado coupe – itself a hugely influential car. Monaro took its roofline, rear pillars and rear wheel arch blisters from the spectacular Toronado, mixed them with Holden’s own design cues and worked it all into a spectacular coupe, designed for the maximum ‘wow’ factor.
    Looking and feeling like the muscle cars on which it was based, the 1968 Monaro featured a wide, gaping grille, leading into broad, powerful flanks. At the back there was an almost constant slope from its rear window to its boot lid. Sleek and suave, Monaro was the epitome of cool.
    Under the wide and imposing bonnet the all-Australian coupe offered no fewer than 19 engine and transmission combinations, destined to give the kind of raw performance such a monumental design deserved.
    Entered into the Sandown 3-hour race and the Hardie Ferodo 500 at Bathurst, Monaro became a formidable force in Enduro racing, collecting a one-two-three finish at Bathurst and a one-two victory at Sandown in its debut year.
    With such a pedigree, Monaro easily and quickly lured customers from every part of the spectrum, each one seduced by its striking looks and enormous presence.
    Its success was set to continue for the following 11 years through changes in design, tweaks in its set-up, lurid paint finishes and continued racing glories. However, 1979 was the last year that the Monaro name was used. Stifled by strict anti-pollution legislation in 1976, V8-powered cars began to fall from favour, leading to the all-Australian sports car’s demise in the late ’70s.
    However, although Monaros had disappeared from Australia’s roads, they hadn’t disappeared from the Australian psyche. Those too young even to dream of owning a Monaro first time round, still hankered after the ultimate Australian sports car, and with the unveiling of the Holden Concept Coupe in 1998 at the Sydney Motor Show it seemed their dreams would come to fruition.
    Incredibly, the designer, Michael Simcoe, and his team had worked on the concept in complete secret for months beforehand – after hours and at weekends – to create the car, persuading the head of engineering to cover all costs. Even more incredibly, Holden boss Jim Wiemels only found out about the concept’s existence three weeks before the Sydney Show, but after seeing it was determined to have it on the stand.
    Based on the lines of the Holden VT Commodore, the Concept Coupe received rapturous applause at the Sydney Show. It caught everyone’s imagination and went on to become the next generation Monaro just 22 months after its Motor Show debut. The legend had been reborn.
    From its inception to its current incarnation Monaro represents the pinnacle of style and performance; never before or since has a car had such an enormous impact on the Australian people. Small wonder then, that it has icon status in its homeland, and is loved world wide.
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  2. #12
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    Design
    LOOKING GOOD, INSIDE AND OUT
    • New bonnet vents increase aggressive visual appeal
    • Seats four adults comfortably
    • Dynamic and distinctive design
    • Premium performance-oriented interior
    Big and beautiful, Monaro VXR looks and feels every inch the luxury performance coupe. Making full use of top quality materials it offers the car enthusiast the very best of sports car power, opulence and looks, with the assurance of longevity and reliability.
    Based heavily on the Holden VT Commodore, Monaro designer Mike Simcoe worked hard to get the proportions right and generate the perfect curves. The sleek, expressive styling is testament to his constant re-evaluation and effort.
    No-one had any complaints about the look of the previous Monaro VXR, so changes have been kept to a minimum with only the addition of two ‘nostril’ bonnet vents, new wheels and the quad tailpipes marking out the new model visually.
    Added together the look encompasses a potent on-road presence from any angle, but Monaro’s low lines and stylishly truncated rear end are especially effective in side profile, and ooze aerodynamic purpose.
    Undeniably slick outside, the inside of the Monaro is just as exciting. With full double-stitched leather as standard, Monaro is specified to offer the very best in comfort, style and ergonomics.
    Eight-way electrically adjustable seats in front are contoured to cosset the driver and front passenger completely. The two rear seats, which will easily accommodate two adults, are also fashioned for comfort and a close fit, ensuring high ride quality all round. An electric slide-forward mechanism allows ready access to the rear seats.
    Instrument clusters, highlighted by satin silver binnacle rings, bring the attention back to front of the cabin. Two extra dials – showing oil pressure and voltage output – are housed in their own binnacle on top of the centre console. A smart four-spoke steering wheel matches the leather on the handbrake and gear lever, increasing the car’s coherent feel.
    The smoothly integrated instrument panel features modern controls and graphics and sits beneath a large screen, multi-function display, which incorporates climate control, infotainment and trip computer information. A six-disc CD changer is standard, as is a 10-speaker sound system, further enhancing the interior.
    Other, driver-oriented features include cruise control, to make long motorway journeys less dreary. Plus, as you won’t want to chance denting Monaro’s beautiful lines, rear park assist is also a standard feature.
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  3. #13
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    Market
    POUNDING THE OPPOSITION
    • A superb driving dynamics with a practical twist
    • Power for £ supremacy
    • A car aficionado’s dream
    Bored with the bewinged, over-turboed Japanese saloons and underpowered, overpriced German coupes? Then go and play by Aussie rules, with the Monaro VXR. Aimed squarely at the car enthusiast, the Monaro VXR is the perfect antidote to the computer game-like electronically controlled dynamics of modern performance cars. Everyone will be impressed by its stunning good looks, while petrolheads will be hypnotised by its sheer power and ability.
    In its limited market place, nothing else can offer the Monaro VXR’s combination of sheer power and metal for the money. In terms of coupes, the Jaguar XKR also offers a 400bhp V8 (albeit a supercharged 4.2 versus the Monaro’s 6.0-litre) but costs a massive £23,000 more. The 362bhp Mercedes CLK 55 AMG is a fraction cheaper at £58,960, and the BMW M3 gets closer still on price (at £41,150) but can only offer 343bhp. Even Mitsubishi’s highly-tuned, 2-litre, 4-cylinder Lancer EVO FQ400 costs a massive £46,999, and TVR’s 390bhp Tuscan S is a surprisingly pricey £48,800.
    This combination of value and performance meant that the outgoing Monaro VXR was a sell-out success, with all the production run of 50 cars being snapped up within three months of going on sale. This led to some disappointed buyers, so Vauxhall is increasing the number of new VXRs which will be brought in to 300 over the next 18 months.
    Although this will mean that more drivers get to experience the brute force of the flagship VXR, it will still be a rare and exclusive beast, especially compared to some rivals. Expected to find particular favour with affluent, 30-something, car-aware men, Monaro VXR has enormous power, drivability and presence but will easily seat four adults in comfort. So, as well as being a terrifically good drive – thanks in no small way to its 6.0-litre V8 engine and RWD set-up – it’s also extremely practical.
    The perfect choice for grown-ups who haven’t quite grown up, Monaro offers the very best of all worlds. It can be a well-set-up head turner with an unstressed V8 providing effortless performance, or a track day tool which will play to win with supercars, and provide plenty of sideways handling action on demand.
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  4. #14
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    Driving and Dynamics
    THE WHIZZER OF OZ – 404 PS MONARO VXR
    • Musclecar for real enthusiasts
    • 6.0 litre V8 with RWD for purest driving experience
    • Exceptional performance from legendary ‘small block’ V8
    There’s no doubt that modern front wheel drive cars with compact engines suit the majority of British motorists. But the real enthusiast will always crave a car which constantly rewards and challenges the driver, and nothing but a musclecar will do the job. With 404PS and a rumble from the exhaust which could only come from a big V8, the Monaro is the perfect antidote to mundane motoring.
    Born out of the muscle car dream, Monaro VXR is offered with a huge, 6.0 litre V8 engine, powerful enough to catapult the car to 60mph in just over five seconds and onto a top speed of around 180mph. With the new high-output 6.0-litre LS2 powerplant, which recently made its debut in the Corvette C6, it produces 404PS (up from the last model’s 387PS) and a massive 530Nm of torque (compared to 510Nm). The power behind the Monaro VXR is the legendary small block V8 in its latest LS2 form. The engine is celebrating 50 years of production and an astonishing statistic - more than 90 million have been produced, representing 27 billion horsepower. The small-block has been repeatedly adapted to new situations, and has been used in everything from supercars to pick-up trucks.
    In this application, the engine’s performance is directed through a close ratio, six-speed manual gearbox, designed to let the driver make the most of the engine’s flexibility and power. Electronic throttle control and the immense torque of the new powerplant means that gearchanges are hardly necessary, but the choice of well-spaced ratios ensures that the V8 can always be kept ‘on the boil’ for maximum performance. Alternatively, slot into sixth and the Monaro becomes a relaxed, barely-stressed cruiser which can return surprising economy.
    And, just as importantly, the Monaro sounds great at any speed. The underneath of the car has been completely redesigned to allow the new exhaust to breathe more freely with the addition of an extra pair of tailpipes. Besides making the engine work more efficiently, it also creates a burble with is even more distinctive than the previous Monaro’s.
    Designed in the muscle car tradition, Monaro is rear-wheel-drive. This equates to an exciting, inspiring drive with superb handling and – with standard switchable traction control – the option of serious fun. If anyone ever wanted to learn how to steer using the throttle, this is the car to show them.
    But, while fun is available on tap, precautions have been taken against over indulgence without installing the sort of nannying electronics which can be the bane of an enthusiastic driver’s life. A limited slip differential improves traction, stability and handling, and allows more control of the back end, both improving safety and simultaneously ensuring Monaro is a fully fledged driver’s car. In alliance with the newly-revised suspension – offering sports springs at both ends and gas pressure dampers at the rear – Monaro simply feels awesome and inspirational on the open road.
    Nineteen inch multispoke ‘Chrome Shadow’ wheels shod with wide, low profile, 235/35 19 tyres transmit all this engineering and technology to the road giving Monaro precise steering response and predictability combined with maximum cornering tractability. And of course they look great too!
    When it comes to stopping the car, nothing but the best would do – as you’d expect since it will be required to haul the Monaro down from speeds above 180mph. Using the same braking system as the latest version of GM’s other supercar - the Corvette C6 – the Monaro uses new 330mm vented and grooved discs at the front and 315mm rotors at the rear. These ensure that the middle pedal always has a reassuring feel
    and bite, even after constant hard use. As a finishing touch, the bright red callipers are embossed with the VXR logo.
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  5. #15
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    Value for Money
    SUPERCAR PERFORMANCE – SALOON PRICES
    • 6.0-litre V8 and 404PS for £36,995
    • High specification
    The Monaro VXR’s raison de etre is a dynamic driving experience, but thanks to the global resources of General Motors, it also represents amazing value for money. For £36,995 the enthusiast will be getting an awful lot of car, with rivals costing twice as much for the same power output. In fact the only cars which can get close to having similar power outputs for the same amount of money have engines which have half the cylinders and a third of the capacity!
    And don’t think the Monaro VXR has been stripped of equipment in order to get the price lower. Inside and out the designers worked hard to ensure Monaro has the ambience of a luxury car.
    Externally, 19 inch alloy wheels fill meaty wheel arches, giving Monaro an almost menacing feel, while smooth, sleek lines flow from front to rear, creating feelings of fluidity and dynamism. Quad-pipe exhaust system punctuates Monaro’s blunt rear end.
    Inside the list of standard equipment is all but endless – full leather interior; cruise control; power mirrors, sun roof and windows; ‘intelligent’ wipers; rear park assist; automatic head lamps; trip computer; 10-speaker, six CD sound system; eight-way, electrically adjustable front seats; electric front seat slide for rear access; dual zone climate control; alloy pedals; and metal finish dash, door handles and sill plates.
    Changes for the new model include a new double-stitched leather interior, uprated sport suspension, drive-by-wire throttle control and larger brakes taken from the Corvette C6.
    Equally, safety has not been sidelined to cut costs. Monaro VXR offers driver and passenger airbags; driver and passenger side impact airbags; seat belt pre-tensioners; anti-submarining ramps; child restraint anchor points; quick response LED centre brake light; low fuel, high engine temperature and rear light failure warnings; steering wheel-mounted sound system controls; and active front head restraints and seat backs.
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  6. #16
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    Default Monaro, 5.7iV8 (LS1), www.guardian.co.uk, 21/9/04

    www.guardian.co.uk
    Date: September 21, 2004
    By: Giles Smith
    The Monaro is the sort of car that suddenly fills your rear-view mirror and stays there until you let it through. Can it really be a Vauxhall?
    The new Vauxhall VXR Monaro doesn't take any prisoners. It doesn't take many people altogether, in fact, holding two front passengers in butch, hip-hugging rally seats and just about accommodating another pair of grown-ups in crick-necked discomfort in its virtually inaccessible rear cabin.
    But this isn't a people carrier: it's a "performance" coupe and thus, pretty much by definition, only really has in mind the comfort and pleasure of its driver. Coming along for the ride? Then you'd better grab hold of whatever's available and try not to be sick as we storm into the corners.
    VXR, incidentally, is Vauxhall's new "performance" brand - a new badge, ready to be bolted on to a new generation of Vauxhall motors sharing some of the exhaust-pipe know-how from Vauxhall's rather successful sports department. (VX Racing wins a lot of trophies with its souped-up Astra Coupes.) For launch purposes, they've taken the old VX220 - a turbocharged rollerskate aimed at hardcore speed freaks - and redressed it as the VXR 220.
    And then they've thrown in this new VXR-rated version of the Monaro, which, we learn from the accompanying literature, is aimed at the kind of people who "get up in the night for a blast, just for the hell of it". Which, I suppose, distinguishes the Monaro from other, tamer products in the Vauxhall range, which appear to be aimed at the kind of people who get up in the night to go to the bathroom, just because they have to.
    The car industry, we should be clear, uses the word "performance" in a different way from the rest of us. "Performance", after all, is not an unreasonable thing to expect from any car. It might even be the first thing you expect from it. We all want our cars to perform and are cross when they don't, so even a bog-standard Vauxhall Corsa should, in an ideal world, be a "performance" car.
    In the car industry's helium-injected version of the word, however, "performance" denotes something in excess of mere function. It's a synonym for unusual and possibly even alien levels of speed and power. Also for "unnecessary", "threatening" and "a teensy bit silly, really, if we're going to be honest about it".
    My Monaro came, appropriately enough, in lad-pleasing, did-you-spill-my-pint? red, had some vaguely medieval, five-spoke alloys, which were as high as an elephant's eye, and was tricked out with more ankle-height skirts than you'll see this side of a Merchant Ivory production.
    The little marine details were a further giveaway. Check out the shark gills scored into the sidesills. And check out that thick lower lip at the front, hanging open like the mouth of some gruesome fish. It's the kind of car that, on a motorway, suddenly fills your rear-view mirror with its honeycomb grille and stays there until you meekly pull over - a predator, in other words, converting other cars on the road ahead of it into a panicked mass of terrified plankton.
    Inside, the oil pressure and voltage gauges are mounted high and proud in a binacle above the centre stack, rather than tucked away where they can be safely ignored for the most part, as tends to happen in ordinary, non-performing cars. This is something of a performance motor trait, the underlying assumption being that you will be driving the car at such white-hot intensity that the threat of an electrical storm and, simultaneously, an oil rupture is ever present. Other performance cars achieve the same effect by sporting a prominently mounted, industrial-sized fire extinguisher, though the Monaro passes on this one.
    To some extent, the interior's silky plastics betray the car's origins at the home of the repmobile. But highly motivated indeed would be the rep who could spend all day, every day at the wheel of the Monaro, with its slippery stick-shift, its unhelpful thirst for petrol and its 5.7 litre V8 engine thundering away under the bonnet and moaning out of the exhaust.
    Whether the VXR Monaro is in a position to offer its driver the knuckle-whitening thrills and spills and the all-over bodily pleasures that its manufacturer promises was something that I came to doubt in the course of my week thrashing one up and down the A3 and being mean to other drivers in it. It's quick and tuneful and you can fling it around like a fairground ride, but I also found it a bit too cumbersome to be properly racey and a little too softly padded and acoustically enhanced to achieve the nerve-jarring, through-the-seat and up-the-steering column sensations that many petrol-nuts would expect from a performance vehicle.
    On the bright side, though, it most definitely has a humungous rear wing. It's thick enough that you could snap it off and beat a rhino to death with it, if the circumstances ever arose. Plus it has some sexy circular tail-lights. And it travels so fast in bus lanes that the cameras don't have time to register it. Possibly. Conditions may vary from city to city.
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  7. #17
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    Default Monaro, 6.0iV8 (LS2), www.timesonline.co.uk, 10/7/05

    www.timesonline.co.uk
    Date: 10 July, 2005
    By: Jeremy Clarkson
    Last week the Daily Mail broke off momentarily from writing about immigrants, Princess Diana and the value of your house, and published a photograph of my wife and me walking down the road.
    Why? Well, I was carrying nothing while my wife was lumbering along beside me weighed down with a heavy suitcase.
    “Look at him!” it screamed. “Making his long-suffering wife carry his bags.”
    What this proves, most of all, is the absolute hopelessness of the Daily Mail as a newspaper. My wife was carrying my bags not because I’m a male pig, but because moments earlier an MRI scan had revealed that I’ve slipped two discs. And that carrying heavy suitcases is something I’m not allowed to do any more.
    More importantly, and this is the story those blinkered people on the Mail managed to miss, I’m no longer allowed to drive. Yup, for the next few months I’m off the road.
    Partly this is because I can’t look left or right, partly it’s because my left arm doesn’t work at all, and partly it’s because I’m on a cocktail of drugs so bright and vivid I spend half the day wondering if I’m a horse and the other half answering only to the name of Stephen.
    The only good news is that I’m taking steroids, so by the time I’m fixed I shall have breasts and a handbag and as a result the Daily Mail will write stories about my brave battle with a spinal injury and how I’m an example to women everywhere.
    In the meantime, however, my pain in the neck means I’m not allowed to drive, which will be a pain in the backside. Mostly for my wife, actually, who will have to carry my bags to the car and then drive me to work. She may even have to write this column, because while I have a few cars stockpiled up, the list is not endless.
    Maybe I’ll do some features on what life is like in the back of a Rolls-Royce or a Maybach until the steroids have worked and I’m mended. Unless they don’t, in which case I’ll need an operation, and that could turn me into a drooling vegetable. In which case I’ll do some stories about wheelchairs and mashed food.
    Whatever, in this world where everything is always someone’s “fault”, the most important thing right now is to work out how I, the world’s least active man, managed to slip not one but two discs. I went through all the possibilities with my doctor and we decided that the blame for my condition lies fairly and squarely at the door of Vauxhall.
    Apparently if you spend too long driving round corners much too quickly it will pull all the gooey stuff out of your spine, and last week I spent a very great deal of time going round many, many corners much too quickly in the new Vauxhall Monaro.
    It’s been around for a while now, the Monaro, and nobody seems to have paid it much attention. Small wonder, really, when you consider that it’s an Australian car, with an American engine. Sure, we’ll buy colonial wine and we’ll concede that they’re good at sport, but that’s chiefly because they plainly do very little else.
    In the past 200 years Australia has only invented the rotary washing line, and America’s sole contribution to global betterment is condensed milk. The notion of these two great nations coming together to make a car doesn’t fill anyone from the world’s fountain of ingenuity with much hope.
    Especially when it lumbers into battle sporting a Vauxhall badge.
    The thing is, though, that the original Monaro was a little gem. Or to be more specific, a rough diamond. With a 5.7 litre V8, and 19th-century technology feeding all that torque to the road, it was a crude but devastatingly effective mile-muncher.
    Think of it as an Aussie from the outback. Maybe he can’t quote Shakespeare. Maybe he’s never heard of Terence Conran. But he can smash all the teeth clean out of your mouth with a single punch. That was the Monaro.
    And now there’s a new version. At first glimpse the prospect is even more exciting because it has a restyled bonnet full of aggressive vents and holes, and because underneath it gets an even bigger engine. A 6 litre V8 from the last Corvette.
    Sadly, all is not sweetness and light, because the Monaro is sold in America as a Pontiac GTO and the new version was designed specifically for Uncle Sam. That means it’s all gone a bit soft. And for some extraordinary reason they’ve moved the 60-litre fuel tank to a point directly above the rear axle. This means the car’s handling will change depending on how much fuel you have on board, and also that the boot is nowhere near as big as it should be.
    So, does the extra power from the bigger engine compensate for this? Or is this the automotive equivalent of the American version of The Office: a good idea ruined by the Septics? To find out, I took it to a track and drove round and round until, as we know, my spine disintegrated.
    The first thing worth noting is that the power isn’t delivered in a zingy, revvy European way. It’s more a suet pudding than a champagne sorbet, but there’s certainly no shortage. And as a result you’ll go from 0 to 60 in 5.3sec and onwards to 185. That’s pretty quick.
    The lazy engine certainly suits the whole feel of the car. It lumbers rather than darts, it feels heavy and lethargic. But then you might have said all this about Martin Johnson. And that really is the point of the big Vauxhall. It’s second row, not a winger.
    The gearbox, especially, is worthy of a mention. The lever looks like it’s come from the bridge of a 19th-century ocean liner and the effort needed to move it around is huge. But then this is a muscle car. It’s not for sheilas.
    My favourite part, however, and you’ll only really trip over this on a track, is the way it goes round corners. The angles of oversteer it can achieve, thanks mainly to its long wheelbase, are absolutely ludicrous, and if you keep your foot planted, so too is the volume of smoke from the back wheels. If you have the mental age of a six-year-old, and I have, you would never tire of sliding this massive car from bend to bend.
    In fact, after I wore one set of tyres down to the canvas, I went straight round to a tyre shop, bought two more, and then proceeded to wear those down to the canvas as well. This car is that much fun.
    Of course, it’s not what you’d call luxuriously appointed. There are plenty of toys to play with, and lots of space for four, too, but the quality of the plastic and the feel of the carpets beggars belief. Until you look at the price. This car, this 6 litre V8 185mph muscle car, is less than £37,000 — the same as a BMW 535 diesel.
    Yes, the BMW is more of a quality product, but which would you rather have, a night out with a vicar or a few pints with your mates at the pub? When it comes to fun, the Monaro is truly wonderful, and it’s not bad at cruising either.
    The seats are sublime, it glides over bumps, and at 70mph the engine is barely turning over, so it’s quiet as well.
    It all sounds great but there’s one problem. You can still buy the original, harder, 5.7 litre car. Yes, this only offers up 349bhp compared with the 6 litre’s 398bhp. But you’re pressed to spot that difference on the road.
    And here’s the clincher. The 5.7 is only £29,000. Put simply, there is no better bargain on the market today.
    Thank you, by the way, for all your e-mails on the Ford GT. There have been hundreds and hundreds. Now that I can’t go anywhere I have time to read them. And I’ll let you know what you’ve all decided.
    Vital Statistics
    Model: Vauxhall Monaro VXR
    Engine: V8, 5967cc
    Power: 398bhp @ 6000rpm
    Torque: 391 lb ft @ 4400rpm
    Transmission: Six-speed manual, rear-wheel drive
    Fuel: 17.6mpg (combined)
    CO2: 384g/km
    Acceleration: 0-60mph: 5.3sec
    Top speed: 185mph
    Price: £36,995
    Verdict: A seat-of-your-pants back-breaker, drives like it’s got XXXX in the tank
    Rating: 4/5
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  8. #18
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    Default Monaro, 6.0iV8 (LS2), www.autoexpress.com, 12/05

    www.autoexpress.co.uk (Article from: evo)
    Date: December, 2005
    By: John Barker
    The last evoactive trackday of the year, at Brands in late September, was set to be a super-sliding smokefest. I had cunningly contrived to have a set of worn tyres, ripe for roasting, plus a brand new set mounted up on rims for the trip home. The sight and sound of the 6-litre Monaro monstering around the short Indy circuit was something I was looking forward to; road test ed Bovingdon was going to be there, too, in his project M3 and we'd planned to swap seats.
    Our friends at Vauxhall HQ had managed to rustle up the set of spare rims, and a couple of days before Brands they were re-shod with a set of rather handsome Dunlop SP Sport Maxx tyres, as worn by the Monaro that acts as the pace car in the BTCC. The original-fit Pirelli P-Zero Rosso is reckoned to be the most comfortable-riding in the size (245/35 ZR19) so it'll be interesting to see what difference the Dunlops make.
    The trackday started well. Within a couple of laps the Monaro was edging out at every corner on the Indy lap, even Paddock Hill, its V8 bellowing gloriously through the wonderful new after-market exhaust. Clearways was especially satisfying, the back end hung out for the length of third gear. Then, after about a half-dozen laps, it got suddenly louder. I suspected I knew why and cruised into the pits. There I discovered that the marshals were displeased with the amount of tyre noise at Clearways - local residents complain about this, apparently, which seems absurd - and also that the temporary plug in the exhaust where an oxygen sensor should be had popped out. I could only source an even more temporary plug, so it was game over for the day, though I did get a good strop in the project M3, and a very fine thing it is, too; grippy, precise and taut, like a proper touring car.
    The Lambda sensor had been damaged when the Milltek-developed sports system was fitted, and a replacement has taken almost a month to arrive at the dealer. Its absence seems to have had little effect. As mentioned last month, since the new exhaust was fitted, the Monaro not only sounds fabulous, it also feels stronger and sharper. To that I can now add that economy has improved; the average has jumped from around 22 to 24mpg, and the previous best cruising figure of 24.1 has been raised to 26.1mpg
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  9. #19
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    Default Monaro, 6.0iV8 (LS2), Pictures – Details




  10. #20
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    Default Monaro, 6.0iV8 (LS2), Pictures – with Lotus Carlton







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