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Thread: New purchases

  1. #1
    VXR newbie
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    Default New purchases

    Hello Hello Hello

    I currently have a 2001 Vectra B. I've had it for the last 12 years and it has cost me virtually nothing and served me very well. It could probably keep going but a lot of components are really worn out amd i'm fighting a loosing battle. It's sadly not worth the effort anymore.


    So...the only new cars that appeal to me are the Insignia VXR or the 2L VX Line petrol.

    The Vxr is lovely and I would like to get one. However, when reading on here it seems to be a mixed density minefield of haldex and clutch disasters!
    The VX line seems to be ultra rare. There have been precisely zero on autotrader for a month or so now. What gives?


    Is the facelifted vxr safe in terms of the issues the preface experienced? I'd really like one but I coudn't be dealing with the though that somthing expensive is about to break all the time.

    Also, where have all the 2L turbos gone?


    Many thanks
    Peg
    Last edited by Pegasus2022; 23rd September 2018 at 10:32 PM.

  2. #2
    VXR enough AJG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pegasus2022 View Post


    So...the only new cars that appeal to me are the Insignia VXR or the 2L VX Line petrol.

    The Vxr is lovely and I would like to get one. However, when reading on here it seems to be a mixed density minefield of haldex and clutch disasters!
    First off: try to find an auto, so no clutch problems. Haldex issues can be spotted on a test drive, but there are no guarantees. If you find a good one, get the Haldex serviced right away (fluid and filter) and repeat every 12k miles.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pegasus2022 View Post
    The VX line seems to be ultra rare. There have been precisely zero on autotrader for a month or so now. What gives?
    VX Line isn't a VXR; it's mainly a trim variant without the VXR powertrain. Drive both and the difference will be (painfully) obvious.


    Quote Originally Posted by Pegasus2022 View Post
    Is the facelifted vxr safe in terms of the issues the preface experienced? I'd really like one but I couldn't be dealing with the thought that something expensive is about to break all the time.
    On the facelifted 2014 onwards: timing chains are sorted; haldex can still be an issue; clutch on the manual can still be an issue; front Brembos can be expensive if you have to replace the disc rotors; pads are expensive if you go OEM, but most use 3rd party manufacturers like Pagid.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pegasus2022 View Post
    Also, where have all the 2L turbos gone?
    Same or worse MPG than the VXR...and not a VXR. You might be better waiting a year or two and going for a 2nd hand Grand Sport GSI. The AWD is supposedly different but unproven for reliability. It's supposedly quicker than a VXR, except it's not.

    Bottom line: try a test drive in a VXR then try and find something else giving the same performance for the money. The decision you make to buy one will be based on whether or not you want that V6 Turbo 320 BHP AWD powertrain, which isn't going to appear ever again in a new VX.

  3. #3
    Are you VXR enough? Dalle1985's Avatar
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    The 2.0 is hugely underpowered and the driving experience is nothing like the VXR. You really need to testdrive both to get a feel for just how much better the VXR is. I’ve owned a fully loaded OPC-line 2-0 CDTI with flexride and sports brakes (a former Opel sales managers daily driver... it had EVERYTHING on the list) - so basically what you are looking at, but with a diesel - and an OPC and although the normal car is pretty good, it doesn’t compare in anyway to the OPC/VXR. The AWD and the fanzy suspension geometry means that it handles a lot differently... and then of course there is the sound! Once you’ve heard the cold start up of the VXR, you’ll be sold (make sure to blip the throttle a few times!)

    As to the VXR, sure, there are some known issues. Clutch is underdimensioned, but then again, it all depends on how you drive it. And yes the Haldex can be an issue, but as AJG wrote, it can be checked, and if you service it regularly, it is less likely to fail. I traded mine in at 130k km and it was still on the original clutch (on it’s way though) and haldex with no issues... others have gone through several. For me, the most important thing to look out for is if the car is one of the models affected by chain issues - and if it is, that they have been replaced. If those fail and you take it to Vx, that bill will dwarf the other two (but there are other MUCH cheaper options of course).

    Anyway, with those two options, it wouldn’t be a difficult choice for me - despite the issues!
    2010 Insignia OPC Sports Tourer

  4. #4
    VXRed
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalle1985 View Post
    The 2.0 is hugely underpowered and the driving experience is nothing like the VXR.
    When I test-drove a 2.0T (250) a couple of years ago, from a rolling start it didn't feel much slower than a VXR (both manual). I quite liked the 2.0T 250PS A20NHT engine.

    However, the 4wd of the VXR does make a difference to handling and in the ability to get the power down from a standstill or when the weather is damp.

    Also the 2.8 engine is not direct injection so it shouldn't be at risk of coked-up valves or LSPI which are notorious problems on many DI engines, including from premium manufacturers.
    Insignia Elite 2.8T (2012), Viva SE-AC (2017).

  5. #5
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    Thanks gents, that's some useful information.

    Yes, I was talking about to 250PS A20NHT petrol engine.

    I don't think I want to be risking the bills the Vrx could potenitally throw me. It's a crying shame as it's a very nice car imho and not seen that often. I will test drive it anyway and look for a facelift if I like it.

  6. #6
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    Got a few more questions, given the Gen V haldex doesen't have a filter to change is this more or less reliable than the Gen IV?

    Where does all the crud go if not stopped at the filter for the Gen V?

    Do you just need to change the fluid on the GenV to keep it from failing? Also does tight low speed turns wear it out faster? Are tight low speed turns safe if in normal (non sport/vxr) mode?

  7. #7
    VXR enough AJG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pegasus2022 View Post
    Got a few more questions, given the Gen V haldex doesen't have a filter to change is this more or less reliable than the Gen IV?

    Where does all the crud go if not stopped at the filter for the Gen V?

    Do you just need to change the fluid on the GenV to keep it from failing? Also does tight low speed turns wear it out faster? Are tight low speed turns safe if in normal (non sport/vxr) mode?
    There's some debate about whether or not the Gen V was actually fitted to the facelift 2014 onwards model, as claimed. Mine is 2014 and the new facelift model, and it has a Gen IV. You can recognise these versions by the dimpled stainless steel plate covering the control module and visible from below the car. The Gen V is much easier and quicker to service than the Gen IV, precisely because it has no filter, so it's a bit of a dilemma. Check out YouTube for servicing videos on Volvo Gen IV and Gen V.

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